WORD'S WORTH“So many people get judged when they refuse to put their pain away. They get judged for showing it, for speaking it, for insisting on sharing their memories of abuse with those they know. I am not talking about those overwhelming strangers with their stuff—I am talking about legitimate sharings with those they are connected with in daily life. All too often, they are fed one repressive message or another: “Don’t look back,” “What’s done is done,” “Don’t be a victim,” “Your feelings are an illusion,” “Be strong.” What is ironic about this is that those who insist on embodying and expressing their feelings are actually the courageous ones—unwilling and unable to live a false life. Their stuff is breaking through their defenses because they are tired of carrying the weight of buried truths. They want a healthier and more authentic life. Those who seek to shame their revealings are actually less courageous, turning to repressive mantras in an effort to bypass their own unresolved feelings and memories. If they can shut others down, they can remain shut down themselves. But shut down doesn’t take us anywhere good. If we don’t deal with our stuff, it deals with us. May we all speak our truths, before our buried truths destroy us. Out with the old, in with the true…” Jeff Brown

 

WORD'S WORTH“The Truth loves. It does not judge. It holds a big sword in its hands and can ruthlessly discern what is false and what is true, but it does not hold grudges. If you are not telling the truth to yourself, you will suffer. If it was not ruthless, there would be no learning. Truth doesn’t spoon feed you. Live by truth or suffer. It’s that simple. When you actually awaken to the Truth, you will see that through every circumstance and experience you have always been loved. It is amazing to see there is a thread of love running through every single moment. There never was a victim, not even for a moment. And even though it may have seemed painful, it was just a fierce sword that was there to get you to really see the Truth. Coming to terms with this is difficult, because it steals every thread of victimhood from us.” Adyashanti 

WORD'S WORTH“They were careless people,” F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote of the rich couple at the heart of The Great Gatsby. “They smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.” Some of us are surrounded by destructive people who tell us we’re worthless when we’re endlessly valuable, that we’re stupid when we’re smart, that we’re failing even when we succeed. But the opposite of people who drag you down isn’t people who build you up and butter you up.  It’s equals who are generous but keep you accountable, true mirrors who reflect back who you are and what you are doing.”  Rebecca Solnit

WORD'S WORTH“Perhaps the most important thing we bring to another person is the silence in us, not the sort of silence that is filled with unspoken criticism or hard withdrawal. The sort of silence that is a place of refuge, of rest, of acceptance of someone as they are. We are all hungry for this other silence. It is hard to find. In its presence we can remember something beyond the moment, a strength on which to build a life. Silence is a place of great power and healing.”  Rachel Remen 

Anzac Day 2017

Anzac

Anzac day is when you honour those who actually served their country. The men and women who march, do so knowing that not everyone made it back, and many more cannot march. Wounds, both physical and emotional, sideline many. Some are confined to home, and too many are just lost.

Why would anyone march for Anzac Day when they did not serve? How could they?

The other night a news story reported how recently, several sets of medals had been stolen. Unfortunately, there are people who take the medals for their monetary value but also so that they can pass themselves off as a veteran. No-one should be marching with stolen medals. No-one should march who did not serve. Sometimes family members march in memory of someone. They wear the medals on the other side so that people know. For those who march to honour their family members, I hope your family members knew of your support when they were alive.

People clap for the parades. The presence of people who like the attention, and march without any right to do so, is completely disrespectful. You honour your family, not by marching and pretending you were there or that you care, but by spending time with them. You honour them by attending their parades and clapping for THEM. Not only did they give you life by giving birth to you or your parent, they protected that life and insured your life would have the freedoms that you do. But most importantly, you honour your family member by how you treat them in between the parades and services. They are not just “ornaments” in our life that we take off the shelf of our lives once a year, to dress them up, send them out, and clap.

Anzac Day begins at home. Do you know where your family’s veteran is? How he/she is doing? Have you ever talked to him/her about their service? Have you ever thanked them personally? Have you ever gone with them to a service or a parade? Have you ever met some of their fellow soldiers and listened to their stories? Do you know anything about your veteran?

Anzac Day requires more from us than just clapping on the side of a street. These people don’t need applause as much as they need human contact to reassure them, to help heal them, to encourage them. It is not someone else’s job. It is yours . . . and it is mine.